Bayer Crop Science Canada has extended its support of 4-H Canada to help develop the next generation of leaders in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM).

This nation-wide collaboration will help foster a deeper understanding of STEM by providing the foundation for youth in rural and suburban Canada to spark interest in science and cultivate curiosity beyond the classroom.

“The renewal of our partnership with Bayer is a testament to our successful working relationship,” said Shannon Benner, 4-H Canada CEO. “Bayer’s investment is instrumental to 4-H in the development of our programming in critical areas of need, so therefore I am pleased to continue our work together as we both take an active role in helping youth develop into responsible, caring and contributing young leaders who are passionate about making meaningful contributions into the innovative world of Science and Technology.”

In 2019, science kits will be distributed to 4-H clubs across the country to encourage youth to cultivate their scientific curiosity, develop their skills, and spark their interest in STEM-related education and careers. As well, 4-H Canada’s Hands-on Science – a program that gives volunteer leaders the tools to promote and support science opportunities for youth members – has trained more than 80 science champions to date.

“We’re very pleased to extend our ongoing partnership with 4-H Canada to foster young leaders in STEM,” said Al Driver, President and CEO, Bayer Crop Science Canada. “Since we began this partnership three years ago, we’ve seen tremendously successful outcomes by 4-H youth that have positively affected the health of people, plants and animals – something we’re focused on as a life sciences company. We’re confident this continued partnership will encourage more youth to explore and pursue all areas of STEM, with the hopes of positively affecting change within their communities.”

4-H Canada has close to 25,000 members and more than 7,700 volunteer leaders.

 

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